Resources

Additional tools to more fully equip you for your journey.

Financial Planning

  • Advocis (The Financial Advisors Association of Canada) – consumer information »
    Advocis is the oldest and largest voluntary professional membership association of financial advisors and planners in Canada. Members are experts who can provide a full range of financial services, including estate and retirement planning, wealth management, risk management and tax planning.
  • FP Canada »
    FP Canada advances professional financial planning, developing, promoting and enforcing professional standards in financial planning through the CFP certification and raises Canadian’s awareness of the importance of financial planning. It is FP Canada’s vision to see Canadians improve their lives by engaging in financial planning.

 

Government Sites

  • Old Age Security (OAS) Program »
    The OAS provides you with a modest pension at age 65, if you have lived in Canada for at lest 10 years. This page provides to links to information about the program.
  • Canada Pension Plan (CPP) »
    The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension is a monthly, taxable benefit that replaces part of your income when you retire. If you qualify, you’ll receive the CPP retirement pension for the rest of your life.
  • Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) »
    Helping to save for your child’s future education costs. Parents, family members and friends are eligible to open a RESP on behalf of a child and apply for the Canada Education Savings Grant.
  • RDSP (Registered Disability Savings Plan) »
    An RDSP is a savings plan intended to help an individual who is approved to receive the disability tax credit save for their long-term financial security.
  • First Home Savings Account (FHSA) »
    A first home savings account (FHSA) is a registered plan allowing you, as a prospective first-time home buyer, to save for your first home tax-free (up to certain limits).
  • Home Buyers Plan (HBP) »
    The Home Buyers’ Plan (HBP) is a program that allows you to withdraw funds from your Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) to buy or build a qualifying home for yourself or for a related person with a disability. The HBP allows you to pay back the withdrawn funds within a 15-year period.You can withdraw funds from more than one RRSP as long as you are the owner of each RRSP account. Your RRSP issuer will not withhold tax on withdrawn amounts of $35,000 or less. Some RRSPs, such as locked-in or group RRSPs, do not allow you to withdraw funds from them.

Worksheets

  • Current Expense Worksheet (PDF) »
    This expense worksheet can help you track your daily spending, which is the first step towards putting a plan into action.

Investment Focus & Articles by CWEA Advisors

2023 ReCap

2023 ReCap

As we start the new year, let’s quickly review 2023. Investors faced many challenges last year, including elevated inflation, interest-rate hikes, geopolitical conflicts, and a slowing global economy. That said, those who were patient and rode out the volatility were...

Investment Focus | Issue 17 | Keep Looking Long Term

Investment Focus | Issue 17 | Keep Looking Long Term

It’s fair to say that everyone is happy to see September end, at least from an investing standpoint. It was a month full of market volatility due to stickier inflation data and the U.S. Federal Reserve’s commitment to higher-for-longer interest rates. The markets had been expecting central banks to already be discussing rate cuts, but that hasn’t been the case. On top of that, September tends to be one of the worst months historically for the stock market, and this year was no different.

Near the end of September, the markets were looking toward the risk of a government shutdown, that ended up being kicked down the road.

Investment Focus | Issue 16 | Staying Steady Amidst Economic Shifts: US Debt, Canadian Rates, and Recession Outlook

Investment Focus | Issue 16 | Staying Steady Amidst Economic Shifts: US Debt, Canadian Rates, and Recession Outlook

The likelihood of a recession in Canada is a topic creating buzz among experts. Accountancy firm RSM Canada projects a 60% chance of a recession occurring by the end of 2023, although they believe it would be relatively mild and short-lived. They anticipate that specific sectors, like the labour market, could potentially shield a significant portion of the economy from recessionary effects.

Investment Focus | Issue 13 | An Overdue Correction

Investment Focus | Issue 13 | An Overdue Correction

It has been a volatile start to the year.

We’ve had 30-year highs in inflation, interest rate increases, Covid, the Ukraine/Russia conflict, and China lockdowns. There’s even talk of a European recession next year and potential American recession in late 2023. All of this has caused negative returns in every asset class, especially in the tech space and smaller companies.

Is it time to talk with a financial advisor?

It is never too soon to start the conversation with a financial planner who can help you define your goals and put a plan into place to reach them.